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Environmental Negligence vs. Civil Rights: Black and Hispanic Communities Get More Pollution, Fewer Jobs

By Olivia Rosane ~ EcoWatch ~ One of President Donald Trump’s stated justifications for rolling back environmental regulations has been to bring back jobs in highly-polluting industries like coal. But a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Monday found that, for “communities of racial/ethnic minorities,” welcoming polluting industries for the sake of employment is a tradeoff that doesn’t make any sense. Blacks and Hispanics in…

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Could Rising CO2 Levels Trigger a Nutritional Crisis?

By Maddie Stone ~ Gizmodo ~ A new analysis is reigniting a concern agricultural scientists have been voicing for years: That rising carbon dioxide could exacerbate malnutrition by reducing the nutrient content of staple crops. The study, published in Nature Climate Change, projects that if atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rise to 550 parts per million (ppm)—a level conceivable by later this century if we don’t aggressively reduce emissions—it could result…

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Green Upgrade: How California Is Pioneering ‘Energy Justice’

By Patricia Leigh Brown ~ Yale Environment 360 ~ California has the world’s fourth largest greenhouse gas cap-and-trade program, which raises billions of dollars for the state. An innovative project is directing some of that revenue to bringing renewable power and energy efficiency to some of the state’s most disadvantaged communities. Diana Guzman, a 30-year-old widow, works in a peach packing plant in California’s Central Valley. She lives with her…

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Black Land Matters

By Brian Barth ~ Modern Farmer Leah Penniman is an American anomaly: black, female, and a farmer. In 2016, Penniman hit the streets of Albany, New York, to protest the police brutality that killed Donald “Dontay” Ivy, 39, an unarmed local man. But her primary focus involves fighting what she considers a far more common, yet more subtly brutal, form of oppression. “Corporations, and white folks, in particular, control the…

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How solar projects can transform low-income communities

By Sarah Kennedy ~ Yale Climate Connections In North Philadelphia, one organization is bringing the transformative power of solar energy to low-income neighborhoods. This past spring, Serenity Soular helped raise more than $37,000 from more than 300 donors to finance a solar installation at a community arts center. The group has also completed projects at a Baptist church and a community outreach center. Frank Ortiz of Serenity Soular says that…

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Poor nations at bottom of environment ladder

By By Peter Makwanya ~ NewsDay ~ THE poor, normally referred to, as the “common people” seem to be cursed or ostracised, as a result of not having recognition, no rights, and little freedom, in the societies they live in. Due to their placement in society, the poor normally derive their survival from the environment, in particular, the forest resources near them. When they cut down trees for building houses,…

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Hurricane season not only brings destruction and death but rising inequality too

By Junia Howell ~ The Conversation ~ Hurricane Lane, which drenched Hawaii with four feet of rain, is a reminder of the devastation hurricane season can bring. Only one year ago Hurricane Harvey ravaged Houston, followed closely by Irma and Maria, which left a trail of destruction across Florida and Puerto Rico. Despite the private and government aid provided after these disasters, thousands continue to struggle even today. However, not…

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The Power of City Camping

By Allison Torres Burtka ~ Sierra ~ Until the last couple of months, no one had used Detroit’s sole campground in more than a decade. In May, the first group of kids arrived to set up camp. The site, unbeknownst to most Detroiters, is nestled in the city’s 1,184-acre Rouge Park. Just three years ago, Scout Hollow, once a staple of local Boy Scouts’ camping regimens, was overgrown. That’s when…

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‘Major Victory for Public Health’: Court Orders Trump EPA to Ban Pesticide That Harms Kids’ Brains

By Jessica Corbett ~ Common Dreams ~ “Children, farmworkers, rural families, and science are all huge winners today… EPA’s job is to protect public health, not industry profits.” In a “major victory for public health,” the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit on Thursday ruled the Trump administration illegally blocked a ban on chlorpyrifos—a pesticide linked to brain development delays in children and nervous systems issues for all…

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The U.S. Government Tried to Stop These Kids’ Lawsuit Over Climate Change. It Didn’t Work

By Annie Reneau ~ Upworthy ~ Since 2015, 21 young people aged 8 to 20 have been engaged in Juliana v. the United States, a lawsuit over climate change. The plaintiffs argue that the federal government has not taken sufficient action to battle catastrophic climate change and that the dire future of the planet infringes on their constitutional right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. They contend that…

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